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#27 - Must Be True

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Lukelee
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D; identified ->earthquakes occurred, we don’t see this firm conditional logic in the passage

E; more likely.. like broad wording, can’t avoid this claim. The larger contact, more earthquakes

Good luck
lanereuden
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Why is E better than C?
James Finch
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Hi Lane,

The issue with (C) is that it misstates the reason why "quiet zones" may actually be at risk; it depends on the type of subduction, and how much of the two plates rub up against each other, rather than the gradual buildup and release of energy (a description used in the first paragraph that describes all earthquakes). The second paragraph describes this process: areas where the faster-moving plate is moving the same direction as the slower one and thus has a much steeper descent produce less energy and fewer earthquakes, while areas where two plates are moving in opposite directions see shallower angles of collision and thus more surface area colliding and more energy produced, leading to more earthquakes.

(E) is correct as it represents an inference we can make from the description of the two types of subduction: deeper subduction leads to less energy buildup and fewer earthquakes, while shallower subduction sees more energy produced and more earthquakes.

Hope this clears things up!
lanereuden
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How do plates move in opposite directions, and then... collide? I do not understand this. This would be like 2 people waking away from each other and somehow they bump into one another?
Brook Miscoski
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lanereuden, please take another look at the passage. The plates that move in opposite directions are still touching. Think about it this way--you have one very long bus that is going North, and another very long bus that is going South. They're too close--in fact, they're rubbing against each other. Still touching for a very long time. Think about it another way. You've got one very sheet of plastic laying over top another very long sheet of plastic. One is pulled East while one is pulled West. They're still overlapping for a very long time. You can keep going with the concept--it's completely possible for things that are moving in opposite directions to be touching. As I remember, in this passage it's the buses, but you get the idea.